Home»Opinion»SOLD OUT: YOUTUBE CAVES TO ADVERTISERS WITH NEW RULES+

SOLD OUT: YOUTUBE CAVES TO ADVERTISERS WITH NEW RULES+

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The world has lost track over what should be considered inappropriate material. We are becoming too sensitive to minor things being said nowadays. We are overreacting towards the wrong things.

YouTube, the website in which people can upload videos to the Internet, has started to implement strict guidelines that categorize some videos as not “advertiser-friendly.” Thus demonetizing videos of Youtuber’s.

Being a YouTuber is now considered a valid career option as people can draw an income from uploading videos. Companies would use popular videos to play their commercials, paying the YouTuber who uploaded the video. However, with the harsher guidelines, videos have been deemed too inappropriate for advertisement. With no advertisements, the video is stripped of one way to get income.

The video isn’t removed for being inappropriate, it just doesn’t have ads.

If a video were to reach a severe level of inappropriateness, then it would be removed, however, this grey zone of inappropriate content is controversial. Even though the video is still up without it having ads, the video is not as beneficial to the uploader as it could be.

At first, YouTube used to be a website in which people would upload for the sake of uploading. There was no monetary gain, just the gain of notoriety. Yet, YouTube has grown into this business in which people can gain money from it. People were making money from YouTube and now they have that taken away from them.

And although having no ads may seem as “not a big deal,” that changes the approach of many YouTubers. As YouTube is like any other entertainment platform and just like the entertainment business, no one is going to put in their all unless they see the money.

Instinctively, when we hear that inappropriate content is not “advertiser-friendly,” most people think, “that makes sense, no duh.” But there are certain things that shouldn’t be considered inappropriate content. For instance, videos talking about suicide, rape, and sexuality have been flagged as not “advertiser-friendly.” Especially when dealing with these topics, they can serve to educate, even though they can make people feel uncomfortable.

According to YouTube help on support.google.com, content that is “Controversial or sensitive subjects and events, including subjects related to war, political conflicts, natural disasters and tragedies, even if graphic imagery is not shown” is considered as “advertiser friendly.”

YouTuber’s such as Boogie2988 have had videos demonetize even though he is explaining his experience with anxiety and other mental illnesses. Philip DeFranco, a news reporting YouTuber has also come into difficulty as well. “…by covering the real raw news stories and like not watering it down I got in trouble… if that’s also the case, how the hell am I supposed to talk about news.”

YouTube is trying to encourage and convey a PG world, unfortunately this isn’t a PG world. Nevertheless, YouTube is going to be run how YouTube intends to.

And if the YouTuber’s dealt their cards right, this demonetizing situation shouldn’t interfere immensely. YouTuber’s have built their own businesses, they sell their own merchandise, and have their own fan base. No ad is just a minor hit to their own personal business. But that doesn’t make it easy for aspiring YouTubers who are still trying to build themselves.

Monetization is a privilege to those who abide by the rules of YouTube. You are not obligated to follow the rules, but if you do, you get benefits, which makes sense. Nevertheless, YouTube has overlooked the idea that entertainment comes in different types and some of it is vulgar and uncomfortable. And that’s okay. Not all good entertainment is clean entertainment.

2 Comments

  1. September 17, 2016 at 11:37 pm — Reply

    good for real marketer.

  2. Ben Witschey
    September 18, 2016 at 11:14 am — Reply

    youtubers shouldn’t complain about this. they can still make the videos they want to. if they lose income for it, get it elsewhere. do they have a contract saying they aren’t allowed to? no

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