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Hate Group Rise the Result of American Ignorance

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According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there are 47 separate hate groups within New York State.

The overwhelming majority of these groups belong to the far-right, white identitarian and fascist movements within the United States. The presence of hate groups have always existed, but they have been on a steady increase since the 2016 election.

In an age defined by violent austerity and endless war, without a material understanding of the cause of their issues many will turn to conspiratorial thinking and reactionary nationalism.

The main issues the radical right revolves around is anti-”Islamism”, anti-communism, anti-immigration and “race-realism”. These supposed issues only come from a fundamental misunderstanding of American policies and geopolitics.

For example, without an understanding of the United States’ role in funding the budding Afghani Mujahideen and other Islamic terrorist groups (some of which went on to form Al Qaeda and ISIS) against socialist movements in the middle east in projects such as Operation Cyclone, many are left to believe these terrorist movements grew simply because Muslims are inherently violent. This informs not only racist rhetoric against Muslim immigrants, but foreign policy in the middle east, specifically our popular conception of Palestinian liberation groups.

Secondly, without an understanding of U.S. meddling in Central America, one may simply think that migrants fleeing mass violence are “invading our borders” to “destroy American culture”. For example, the 2018 migrant caravan received excessive reporting, however what wasn’t included in these reports was what these migrants were fleeing. Specifically, decades of US backed coups and election meddling in South America, including 56 military interventions, which has installed right-wing dictatorships and destabilized the entire region causing people in these countries to suffer immensely, including a 59% poverty rate in Guatemala and a 64% poverty rate in Honduras.

It is clear that much of the blatant hate in the United States is ultimately created by US foreign policy. Therefore, it is clear the unfortunate but utter impossibility of destroying these groups by using the U.S. state apparatus (ie: government censorship).

This is also clear due to the increasing presence of prominent reactionary figures within the processes of the U.S. government.

This past week saw Turning Point U.S.A. spokesperson Candace Owens testify in a House Judiciary Committee hearing on online hate speech. Owens is most recently known for her recent Holocaust revisionism in an attempt to rehabilitate the term nationalism. Candace claimed that Hitler was not a nationalist because he killed his own people, ignoring that German Jews, gays, disabled people, etc. were not considered to be part of the German state.

This fundamental misunderstanding of basic Nazi ideology in an attempt to rehabilitate nationalism is not only disgusting but serves the purpose of opening up her teenage audience to more violent and hateful views, as the moderate and more acceptable wing of the reactionary right (such as herself, Ben Shapiro and the like) often serves as a starting point for further radicalization. This could be seen in the tongue-in-cheek reference to Owens made in the recent New Zealand shooter manifesto.

Her involvement, as well as others, in U.S. governmental proceedings shows an absolute disregard for the growing threat of fascism by the establishment parties.

Ultimately, there are only two sufficient solutions to the increase in far right hatred across the country. Firstly, educational campaigns so that young people are understanding of other cultures and the cause of these issues. And secondly, the end of imperialism, the forceful division of the world in an attempt to extend spheres of influence primarily through overthrows and finance capital.

Only once we are educated about the larger picture of these issues can we legitimately transcend this specific incarnation of reactionary nationalism.

5 Comments

  1. May 2, 2019 at 10:26 am — Reply

    “According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there are 47 separate hate groups within New York State.
    The overwhelming majority of these groups belong to the far-right, white identitarian and fascist movements within the United States. The presence of hate groups have always existed, but they have been on a steady increase since the 2016 election.”

    If you actually look at the 47 “hate groups” the SPLC has assigned to New York for 2018, (they being the sole arbiter of this hugely lucrative label), you’ll find that nine of them have been simply marked “statewide,” meaning the company has provided no corroborating information, such as a known city or town, that a journalist or researcher could use to verify the claims. We just get to take the SPLC’s word for it that these groups actually exist with no proof offered whatsoever.

    That’s not good enough and it certainly isn’t good journalism. Big claims require big proof, or any proof, for that matter.

    Of the remaining 38 alleged groups, fully 17 of them are Black, according to the SPLC, and none of those are listed as “statewide” phantoms. This is nearly half of the remaining total and actually outnumbers all of New York’s SPLC-assigned Klan, neo-Nazi, racist skinhead and white nationalist groups COMBINED.

    As for any kind of “increase since the 2016 election,” the SPLC’s own numbers indicate that the number of alleged “hate groups” have actually declined across 9 of 15 SPLC-designated categories, with the Ku Klux Klan at an all-time record low. If the author wishes to imply that correlation somehow equals causation, then one can only assume that the current administration has been disastrous for “hate groups.” Some readers may have differing opinions.

    The SPLC’s “hate group” numbers are for fundraising, not for fact finding. If you wish to accept the company’s claims without performing any kind of fact checking you pretty much have to accept ALL of their claims, no matter how patently ridiculous.

    • Timothy Chizzik
      May 5, 2019 at 11:06 pm — Reply

      I am familiar with the issues of the SPLC, although I often think they are overplayed by the right. However, the point of this article was to explore some of the topics discussed now on the more fringe areas of nationalist politics, not to pick apart a SPLC headline.

    • Mike L
      May 6, 2019 at 4:27 pm — Reply

      The author makes quite a few broad assumptions that just aren’t logical and follow the hive mind of the mainstream media. Probably the most rediculous gaff of this whole article is putting President Trump as the thumbnail, when not once is he mentioned in the entire article.

  2. Mike L
    May 6, 2019 at 4:22 pm — Reply

    Not once is President trump mentioned in this entire article, yet you thought it was appropriate to have him as the photo associated with the article. You hammer the claim that the US has meddled in South America, and that poverty levels are extremely high. Do you have any concrete evidence this “meddling” is the result of this poverty? Do you have any proof other than a vague article from medium to back up such and egrigous claim that it’s the US’ fault South American countries are falling apart? These countries are dominated by violent gangs such as MS13, who are ruthless criminals. These gangs are just as deadly and harmful as Mexican cartels. News outlets love to blame the United States for eveeyone’s Problems. South America in economic ruin? Yeah, it’s the US’ fault. These countries have seemingly no self accountability, and people like you just reinforce that by blaming the US for their own misfortunes and failures. Come on, guy.

  3. Alexander Sakolish
    May 9, 2019 at 7:46 pm — Reply

    “It is clear that much of the blatant hate in the United States is ultimately created by US foreign policy. Therefore, it is clear the unfortunate but utter impossibility of destroying these groups by using the U.S. state apparatus (ie: government censorship).”

    Under the current administration, national policies also foster hate against specified groups, not that censorship is the answer. I would like to see less rhetoric from our leaders.

    “Ultimately, there are only two sufficient solutions to the increase in far right hatred across the country. Firstly, educational campaigns so that young people are understanding of other cultures and the cause of these issues. And secondly, the end of imperialism, the forceful division of the world in an attempt to extend spheres of influence primarily through overthrows and finance capital.”

    I agree with the first point made; I believe that most hatred towards people that are unlike ourselves for any reason, comes from a lack of familiarity and understanding.

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